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The Edgar Mauk Awards
TUNNELS OF DOOM


Since the "Treffen" Meeting in the year 2000, there have been awards in recognition of contributions to the European TI community.  
Tunnels of Doom was a 1982 module made by Texas Instruments for the TI99/4 computer and was created by Kevin Kenney. The module contained code which required the loading of game data from cassette or disk. A sample adventure was sold with the module on disk or tape but subsequent adventure databases were developed by individual users using back-engineered editor programs.


These awards are named after Edgar (Eddy) Mauk (deceased in 1992), a keen TI user from Bavaria.
The module did not have an immediately playable game when you plugged it in, it required you to load a database from tape (slow) or from disk which was somewhat expensive (at the time) as  costly peripherals were required which were not widely owned.  


{|  class="wikitable"
A UK computer game magazine was unimpressed and only gave the module three stars out of five, but it has proved popular with TI owners and has remained in play with quite a number of user written adventures being made available. The game has been so popular it has been recreated in java.
|-
! year         !! held in !! award for !! Winner        !! Nat    !! For
|-
| 2000 (treffen 15) || Gent (BE)  ||    Hardware  ||    Michael Becker    ||  D  ||    SNUG cards
|-
|                || ||                Software ||    Paolo Bagnaresi  ||  I    ||  E/A Software
|-
|                    || ||            Internet  ||  Thierry Nouspikel ||  CH    || Site: TI-Tech
|-
|                  || ||          Newsletter ||  Marcel de Gier  ||  NL  ||    TIjdingen (TIGG)
|-
|                  || ||          Community  ||  Stephen Shaw    ||    UK   ||  TI in the UK
|-
| 2001 (treffen 17) || Nottingham (UK) || Hardware  ||    Thierry Nouspikel ||  CH  ||  IDE card
|-
|                      ||      ||      Software  ||    Harald Glaab  ||      D  ||    DSR for SNUG
|-
|            ||  ||                  Internet  ||    Fabrice Montupet ||  F  ||    Site: TI99 Forever
|-
|                    ||  ||                Newsletter ||  Wolfgang Bertsch ||  D  ||    Errorfree disks
|-
|                    ||  ||                Community  ||  Berry Harmsen  ||    NL  ||  USA Contacts
|-
| 2002 (treffen 16) || Wuppertal (DE)||  Hardware ||    Michael Becker  ||    D    ||  SNUG Cards
|- 
|                        ||  ||          Software  ||    Fred Kaal      ||    NL  ||    SCSI software
|-
|                        ||  ||          Internet  ||  Dirk Seinfeld  ||    D  ||    Site: Bromosel
|-
|                      ||  ||            Newsletter ||  Paul Saunders  ||    UK  ||  TI*MES (TIUGUK)
|-
|                        ||  ||          Community  ||  Roger Muijs ||    B  ||    Organising Treffen
|-
| 2003 (treffen 18) || Wenen (AT) || Hardware    ||  Thierry Nouspikel ||  CH  ||  USB Card
|-
|                    ||  ||              Software    ||  Wolfgang Bertsch  ||  D    ||  TIllionaire
|-
|                    ||  ||            Informatie  ||  Alan Bray    ||      UK  ||    Site: Bricktop
|-
|                        ||  ||          Community  ||    Kurt Radowitsch ||    AT  ||      Organising Treffen
|-
| 2004 (treffen 19) ||  Birkenau (DE) || Hardware  ||      Michael Becker  ||      D  ||      SNUG Card
|-
|                  ||  ||            Software  ||      Fred Kaal    ||        NL  ||      TI & PC Software
|-
|                        ||  ||            Informatie  ||    Marcel de Gier  ||      NL  ||    Tijdingen (TIGG)
|-
|                      ||  ||            Community  ||    Oliver Arnold ||      D    ||    Organising Treffen
|-
| 2005 (treffen 20) ||  Venlo (NL)  ||    Computer  ||      Wolfgang Bertsch  ||    D  ||      TI Software
|-
|                    ||  ||              Community  ||      Richard Twyning ||    UK  ||      Support TIUGUK
|-
| 2006 (treffen 21) ||  Flensburg (DE)  ||  Computer  ||    Fred Kaal  ||        NL    ||    TI & PC Software
|-
|                        ||  ||            Community  ||    Jens-Eike Hartwig  ||  D    ||    Organising Treffen
|-
| 2007 (treffen 22) ||  Hilversum (NE)  ||  Computer    ||  Thierry Nouspikel  ||  CH  ||    TI Hardware
|-
|                              ||  ||      Community    ||  Marcel de Gier    ||    NL    ||    Tijdingen (TIGG)
|-
| 2008 (treffen 23) ||  Paderborn (DE)  || rowspan="2" | Computer    ||    Mark Robert Wills  ||  UK      || rowspan="2" | Site: Planet 99
|-
|                          ||  ||                          Torben Anderson  ||    DK
|-
|                      ||      || rowspan="2" | Community    ||  Martin Zeddies    ||    D || rowspan="2" | Organising Treffen
|-
|                            ||                        ||  Jörg Kirstan   ||  D
|-
| 2009 (treffen 24) ||  Wenen (AT)    ||  Computer    ||    Filip van Vooren  ||  B    ||    Transfer Games
|-
|                    ||            ||    Community    ||    Kurt Radowitsch    ||  AT    ||    Organising Treffen
|-
| 2010 (treffen 25)  || Nottingham (UK) ||  Computer    ||    Gary Smith    ||      UK  ||    Design New Geneve
|-
|                    ||  ||                Community    ||  Trevor Stevens    ||    UK ||    Support TIUGUK
|-
| 2011 (treffen 26)  ||  Rome (IT)  ||  Computer  ||    Mark Roberts Wills ||  UK    ||    Turbo Forth Module
|-
|                  ||  ||              Community    ||  Ermanno Betori    ||    I    ||    Organising Treffen
|-
|                    ||  ||              Community  ||    Klaus Lukaschek   ||  AT    ||  Italian TI Group
|-
| 2012 (treffen 27) ||  Augsburg (DE)  || Computer    ||    Michael Zapf    ||    D    ||      MESS Development
|-
|                        ||  ||          Community    ||  Oliver Arnold    ||    D    ||    Organising Treffen
|-
|                        ||  ||          Community    ||  Ciro Barile ||  IT    ||    Italian TI Group
|-
| 2013 (treffen 28)  || Eindhoven (NL) ||  Computer  ||    Fred Kaal      ||    NL    ||    Developing
|-
|                    ||  ||              Community    ||  Ronald Kalwij  ||    NL    ||    Years supporting TIGG
|}


Details courtesy of Google Translate from http://www.ti-99.nl/ema.php extracted December 2014.
Java: Tunnels of Doom Reboot (http://www.dreamcodex.com/todr.php) by Howard Kistler (with Kevin Kenney's agreement), also has a conversion tool to allow the older third party adventures to be converted.
 
Main gameplay was through the module, while game items- names, values, powers, graphics - were stored in the external databases and could be edited using verioud programs which were developed by third parties.
 
An online manual is held by the Museum of Adventure Game History at https://www.mocagh.org/loadpage.php?getgame=tunnelsofdoom (click the pdf icon) with another copy at 99er.net: http://www.99er.net/download2/index.php?act=view&id=155
 
Although the Wizard character (or equivalent- the name could be amended)  had limited defence capacity, the base coding left a gap for the Wizard - or any other player- to have armour with a rating of up to 37. How to do have increased shield protection...
 
One player way:
1. Leave the shop without armour or shields but retain enough cash to buy some!
2. Go to an empty room (kill enemies, pick up things but if there is armour, go to a different room.
3. Select T (Trade)and select Opt 4 Shields,  and Who? = self
4. Congratulations you now have armour with a value of zero
5. Select T (Trade) Opt 3, Armour and you are about to get rid of armour with a value of zero:
6. Give to?  Just press ENTER which will drop your armour.
 
Two ways beckon now:
Route A:
i. Who?  Select SELF
ii. Too much!!! Drop what? The armour with a value of zero.
iii. Go to the shop and buy any old armour.
iv. Go back to the room you dropped your worthless armour in.
 
OR Route B (from 6 above):
a. T (Trade) shields, Who? Self
b. You have armour value 0 again and the room has armour value 0.
c. Leave and reenter.
 
now from route A or B:
7. Who? Self
8. Too much to carry- drop? Drop the armour value 0 or whatever you purchased in Route B
9. You now carry armour with a value of 32, even if you are a Wizard.
 
----
OR
Multiple players- say two players A and B.
1 One player must not purchase armour, the other player should purchase armour in the shop.
2 Go to empty room (see solo point 2)
3.both players Trade - Shields- Self
4.both players Trade - with other player- Armour
5. Both now have armour=32.
 
Armour=32 can be increased to 37 using eg Repair Scroll etc.

Latest revision as of 20:29, 9 March 2019

TUNNELS OF DOOM

Tunnels of Doom was a 1982 module made by Texas Instruments for the TI99/4 computer and was created by Kevin Kenney. The module contained code which required the loading of game data from cassette or disk. A sample adventure was sold with the module on disk or tape but subsequent adventure databases were developed by individual users using back-engineered editor programs.

The module did not have an immediately playable game when you plugged it in, it required you to load a database from tape (slow) or from disk which was somewhat expensive (at the time) as costly peripherals were required which were not widely owned.

A UK computer game magazine was unimpressed and only gave the module three stars out of five, but it has proved popular with TI owners and has remained in play with quite a number of user written adventures being made available. The game has been so popular it has been recreated in java.

Java: Tunnels of Doom Reboot (http://www.dreamcodex.com/todr.php) by Howard Kistler (with Kevin Kenney's agreement), also has a conversion tool to allow the older third party adventures to be converted.

Main gameplay was through the module, while game items- names, values, powers, graphics - were stored in the external databases and could be edited using verioud programs which were developed by third parties.

An online manual is held by the Museum of Adventure Game History at https://www.mocagh.org/loadpage.php?getgame=tunnelsofdoom (click the pdf icon) with another copy at 99er.net: http://www.99er.net/download2/index.php?act=view&id=155

Although the Wizard character (or equivalent- the name could be amended) had limited defence capacity, the base coding left a gap for the Wizard - or any other player- to have armour with a rating of up to 37. How to do have increased shield protection...

One player way: 1. Leave the shop without armour or shields but retain enough cash to buy some! 2. Go to an empty room (kill enemies, pick up things but if there is armour, go to a different room. 3. Select T (Trade)and select Opt 4 Shields, and Who? = self 4. Congratulations you now have armour with a value of zero 5. Select T (Trade) Opt 3, Armour and you are about to get rid of armour with a value of zero: 6. Give to? Just press ENTER which will drop your armour.

Two ways beckon now: Route A: i. Who? Select SELF ii. Too much!!! Drop what? The armour with a value of zero. iii. Go to the shop and buy any old armour. iv. Go back to the room you dropped your worthless armour in.

OR Route B (from 6 above): a. T (Trade) shields, Who? Self b. You have armour value 0 again and the room has armour value 0. c. Leave and reenter.

now from route A or B: 7. Who? Self 8. Too much to carry- drop? Drop the armour value 0 or whatever you purchased in Route B 9. You now carry armour with a value of 32, even if you are a Wizard.


OR Multiple players- say two players A and B. 1 One player must not purchase armour, the other player should purchase armour in the shop. 2 Go to empty room (see solo point 2) 3.both players Trade - Shields- Self 4.both players Trade - with other player- Armour 5. Both now have armour=32.

Armour=32 can be increased to 37 using eg Repair Scroll etc.